Building U.S.-Indonesia Mutual Understanding Since 1994

USINDO DC Special Open Forum, USINDO’s History Series, November 29, 2017 “Indonesia’s September 30, 1965 Movement and the Beginning of the Suharto Era: Enhancing our Understanding Drawing on Recently Released U.S. Records

November 29, 2017 2:30 pm - 4:15 pm UTC-5

Fairmont Hotel

170 St NW

Organized By

USINDO

+1.202.232.1400

Cordially invites you to a

Special Open Forum 

USINDO’s History Series 

 

Indonesia’s September 30, 1965 Movement and the Beginning of the Suharto Era: 

Enhancing our Understanding Drawing on Recently Released U.S. Records  

Speaker: Dr. Bradley Simpson
Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies, University of Connecticut
Founder and Director, Indonesia and East Timor Documentation Project
National Security Archive

Discussant:  Dr. Barbara Harvey
Retired Foreign Service Officer and USINDO Advisor 

Second Discussant: t.b.d.

 

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

2:30 – 4:15 p.m.

 

USINDO
1625 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Suite 550
Washington, D.C. 20036

It has now been over 50 years since September 30, 1965, a date that dramatically changed Indonesian history. A small group of Indonesians identifying themselves as the September 30 Movement, alleged to be working in collaboration with the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI), launched an overnight strike against Indonesian generals whom they alleged were planning a coup against President Sukarno. Six top generals were killed, but then-Major General Suharto thwarted the September 30 Movement. He subsequently began a military-led program to crush the PKI, which resulted in the execution of both its leaders and followers. In the ensuing power struggle with President Sukarno over Indonesia’s political and economic future, Suharto consolidated his control, leading to his New Order government which lasted for 32 years.

The domestic and international environment in the period leading up to September 30; the events of the night itself; the extent and nature of the actions that followed; the roles and motivations of the parties; and the knowledge, stance, and actions of the U.S. and other governments, have long been matters of historical inquiry and debate. Recent documents declassified by the U.S. government and made available through requests of the National Security Archive, a Non-Government Organization, shed light on these important subjects. This program will deepen our understanding of this pivotal period of history through both presentation and discussion.

Our guest speaker is Dr. Bradley Simpson, founder and director of the Indonesia and East Timor Documentation Project at the National Security Archive, Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at the University of Connecticut, and Author of “Economists with Guns: Authoritarian Development and U.S.-Indonesian Relations, 1960-1968”.

Please join us on November 29 for this important event. Space will be limited.
Please RSVP HERE and email usindo@usindo.org and dmerrill@usindo.org as soon as possible, and not later than Monday, November 27 at 3:00 p.m.

 

Speaker’s Bio:

Brad Simpson is Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at the University of Connecticut and the author of Economists with Guns: Authoritarian Development and U.S.-Indonesian Relations, 1960-1968. He is also Founder and Director, Indonesia and East Timor Documentation Project, National Security Archive (a non-government organization in Washington DC).

He teaches and researches twentieth century U.S. foreign relations and international history, and has an interest in US-Southeast Asia relations, political economy, human rights and development. His first book, Economists with Guns: Authoritarian Development and U.S.-Indonesian Relations, 1960-1968 (Stanford 2008) explores the intersection of anti-Communism and development thinking in shaping U.S. Indonesian relations.